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October 19, 2012 / Dale Melchin

The Tao Of Economics Part II

This next part is the tactical side of the Tao of Economics.  In this entry I will focus on the character, thoughts and attitudes what it should look like to practice the Tao of Economics.

From the stance of the business owner, leader, investor, manager etc, this will work out one of two ways.  Either, like most of the rich in America they will have made their way through hard work.  With that being the case, they will generally be able to recall their roots fairly quickly and be able to establish a connection with the individual in the position of a worker.  This is a good thing because the work is half finished.

The other way it will work out is that the business owner would have been “high born.”  They come from a family of successful people and so they already have connections.  This is a two edged sword b/c they were working from almost another plane of existence and it would be difficult for them to be able to relate to the worker.  So they have to work harder to establish that connection.  However it is not that difficult, b/c the businessman is held to expectations to and has to work as well, even though the work may be of a different kind.  Both parties endure stress, both parties have personal and family demands placed upon them.

In other words.  The businessman and the worker are both human, and both have an economic interest in the business they are in.

The thing the business man needs to take care of is to refrain from arrogance and to be as generous and humane to his workers as possible.  This will engender trust with the workers.  Unless, of course the worker is so jaded that they won’t recognize kindness from an owner even if it came up and passionately kissed them on the mouth. (The kindness mind you, not the owner.)  They should refrain from judgmental phrasing such as, if they weren’t so lazy they’d get ahead.  Or the thought that where a person is, is a result of excessive vice.  Now, granted, a persons position in life often results from choices made, and sometimes that includes vice.  The point is to think the best of the other person, even if it is revealed that they didn’t make the best choices.  Just encourage them to make better ones

From the worker’s side, they must realize that the business man works as well just again, a different kind of work.  It is also wise for the worker to understand that they are replaceable.  I hate to say that but even though we are all different, if you are in a position of being a worker you are replaceable, given the fact that there are many of us out there waiting to be employed.  The key to fixing this problem is to make yourself into a lynchpin so that you are irreplacable.  That however, takes time, effort and investment similar to what the businessman has to go through in order to get where he is, but I digress.

The worker also needs to have a proper attitude toward the business owner.  Yes, one of deference and respect, however, coupled with a healthy self interest.  I’m not looking to cultivate doormats.  I’m looking to cultivate a good spirit between business men and workers.  A worker must not immediately attribute the success of a business man to vice either.  We immediately ruin what could be a great relationship with a potential benefactor by immediately attributing whatever success they have achieved to vice.  However, if there is wrong doing, one should not be afraid to blow the whistle.

To recap:

Rich, poor, or inbetween, we are all human, imperfect and fallible.  So we need to recognize the humanity in each other.  Yes, standards have their place, but the relationship should be cultivated and those standards kept in mind.

Business owners: be kind to your workers, they are your best asset.

Workers:  Be kind to the business owners, respect them and do as you are asked.  Engender trust with them, don’t act entitled and you stand a better chance of getting more.

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